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NASCAR takes the blame for the Martinsville backlash with an honest admission

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Three short track races have passed, and the discussion surrounding NASCAR's short track package has continued to deteriorate and is now concerning. With Martinsville failing to recapture its usual magic, top officials are now looking for solutions to “get to a better place” as the season pauses the short track Blues for nearly four weeks until the All-Star in North Wilkesboro later.

NASCAR admits short track package needs repairs after Martinsville

Out of Denny Hamlin on his podcast on The Athletic's Jeff Glucks In a poll assessing fan reaction to this week's Cup race, approximately 68.1% of the NACAR community did not appear to think the Cook Out 400 was “a good race.” Even last week's Richmond spectacle was widely considered somewhat “uninteresting” in the general fan mood, that is, until the final restart.

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Martinsville's latest performance forced NASCAR's vice president of regulatory and technical inspection, Mr. Elton Sawyer to talk about the current situation. He told SiriusXM NASCAR Radio in recent revelations: “I promise you that with Goodyear we are working as hard as we can and must work even harder. This is the end result. We have to work harder to get to a point where, as I said a few weeks ago, we have to figure out how to take what we learned in Bristol and also what we learned in the first 30 last week Having learned laps in Richmond, being able to put it into words, this race took off…”

Sawyer assured fans of improvements in the face of an ever-evolving NASCAR landscape, saying: “We are not resting on what we did yesterday. Today we’re going to revisit it, work on solutions and try to get to a better place.”

Indeed, as Jeff Gluck notes in his “Top 5” column at The Athletic, this “should be viewed as a full-blown crisis.” But what's going wrong with the sport's premier sanctioning body on racetracks under one mile, given the aerodynamic changes and constant development and latest technologies?

The current short track scenario is plagued by many problems

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The excitement surrounding controversial final laps, short track restarts and mysterious tire problems may have helped turn the sport into a global viewing experience. However, it appears that all of this was short-lived, as Martinsville witnessed. The broadcast spectrum was also consistently disappointing.

From David Ragan's graphics error at Daytona to another error at the last race where a breakdown of previous winners at Martinsville showed the incorrect names of all race winners from the last two years, with the exception of Ryan Blaney's win in the fall race in October.

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In fact, the numbers also indicate a decline in viewership compared to last year. SBJ's Adam Stern recently revealed that last year's Martinsville race received about 27,000 more viewers than this year's race of 2.19 million. Even Steve Letarte And Jeff Burton discussed this issue plaguing short tracks in discussions on NBC's YouTube channel.

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Burton explained the changing dynamics of sport in general best when he urged people to: “Go to the track“Where it’s more competitive personally, even if he admits it’s not the same close, short-distance race.”We saw it 10 years ago.” When NASCAR redoubles its efforts for the millionth time, there will surely be changes. How soon? Only time can tell.