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NASCAR's “Pretty F**ked Up” $5,000 Hypocrisy Is Under Fire From Angry Fans After Viral Moment's Fine

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After the Cup Series race in Richmond, the only thing on the NASCAR community's mind is penalties. Although many criticized officials for turning a blind eye to Denny Hamlin's jump start, the sport also came under fire for the $5,000 fine it levied on Xfinity Series veteran Joey Gase for throwing his rear bumper cover on another car had thrown on the route, under fire. Unlike one of the sport's most established drivers, who escaped unscathed, the owner and driver of Joey Gase Motorsports had a hefty bill to pay.

While fans had been clamoring for stricter enforcement of the rules, the $5,000 fine appears to have backfired. Ironically, NASCAR doesn't seem to satisfy fans in any way. With that in mind, the fact that the sport now appears to be using the Gases incident as a marketing tool may have had a major impact on fan disapproval.

Joey Gases and NASCAR's MLB edit goes wrong

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Joey Gase's weekend at Richmond got the worst on lap 173 of the Xfinity race. Dawson Cram's No. 4 Chevrolet lined up on the inside of Gase but made contact, causing the No. 34 Chevrolet to crash into the wall. This caused significant damage to Joey Gase Motorsports' car, making the team owner and driver a very unhappy man. And he didn't hesitate to show it right away.

Gase waited for the right moment and pulled off the damaged rear bumper cover. Soon the #4 drove past him and the driver of the #34 threw the cover onto the windshield of Cram's Chevy. The piece of debris caused significant damage through contact with the hood and windshield before falling onto the track. Although Gase seemed to have gotten away with his schemes until Monday, that would soon change. On Tuesday, NASCAR announced that they would be fining Gase $5,000 for his on-track conduct under Section 8.8.8K. The paragraph quoted by Motorsports.com read: “A safety violation may be assessed for any act or omission by a participant or vehicle that creates an unsafe environment or poses a threat to the safety of participants, as determined by NASCAR.”

While those responsible had previously remained silent, many believed the late penalty was influenced by Sunday's Denny Hamlin debacle. Still, fans could understand why NASCAR chose to punish Gase. After all, his behavior would not go unchecked in any racing series in the world. But what upset fans was when the NASCAR account went up

Of course the fans were on

The community calls out NASCAR's double standards while defending Joey Gase

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To put things in perspective, it's worth considering how much $5,000 really is for a team like Joey Gase Motorsports. In addition, the team has suffered major damage for which it must pay. Of course, it seemed like NASCAR was rubbing salt on the team's wounds when they released the model edit. The fans wasted no time in defending the No. 34 driver. They fined the guy and then used him to generate clicks and views. Shameless,while others agreedYes. Pretty shitty.”

While fans didn't dispute that Gase's actions deserved a penalty for safety reasons, they couldn't imagine NASCAR using the incident for marketing purposes. Users continued to rant while sharing memes; “NASCAR: Fines Joey Gace $5,000 for this. Even NASCAR: uses it as advertising.” Others also pointed to a trend in such incidents; “I mean, look at the Hail Melon move after it was banned 😂 typical NASCAR”

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Still, some tried to be the voice of reason. Since the governing body responsible for enforcing the rules and the operational social media team are miles apart, many gave the benefit of the doubt to sport. One fan tweeted: “When you realize that competition and social media are two different entities 😯,” while others added to this notion by writing: “That’s fine because we don’t need drivers running into traffic.”

Another fan commented: “You can't set a precedent by saying we need drivers to go to a hot track every week and throw stuff. “That’s not a bad sentence considering Bobby, Donnie and Cale all received higher sentences for 1979.”

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Ultimately, it's safe to say that NASCAR doesn't seem to be in the best of places in the community right now. What do you think of NASCAR's contribution?